Metallic Silhouette History

The Legend of Pancho Villa (1910 – 1924)

There is something very alluring that our silhouette sport has its possible origins in the last days of the Wild West…..

Era of the Live Animal Shoots ( 1925 – 1940)

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Metallic Silhouette Begins (1940 – 1960)

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Enter the NRA (1970 -1980)

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American Rifleman – July 1973
American Rifleman – November 1974

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A Ewe Silhouette Gift For Ridgway

A special presentation by Daniel Salazar of McAllen, Texas. Daniel did extensive research into the origin of silhouette as a sport, which began with the use of high power rifles. Through his research, he began a dialogue with the Club De Tiro Caza Cananea in Sonora, Mexico, which created the first silhouettes for high power rifle shooting….

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Original Silhouette Target Presentation

Get picture of Ewe in Clubhouse

In addition to the competition, during smallbore there was a special presentation by Daniel Salazar of McAllen, Texas. Daniel did extensive research into the origin of silhouette as a sport, which began with the use of high power rifles. Through his research, he began a dialogue with the Club De Tiro Caza Cananea in Sonora, Mexico, which created the first silhouettes for high power rifle shooting. In the beginning, the shape of an ewe was used as the 500-meter target. This later evolved into the ram silhouette that competitors shoot at today.

Through his conversations with the club in Sonora, Mexico, Salazar discovered that the original ewe targets made in the early 1950s still exist. One of the original ewe targets was brought to the United States and presented to the Ridgway Rifle Club to honor their ongoing efforts to promote rifle silhouette in the United States. The presentation was met with surprise, excitement and tears–as well as an overwhelming sense of appreciation for this piece of competitive shooting history.